What Is the Diet for Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Foods to avoid with RA

There is no special RA diet or diet “cure” for rheumatoid arthritis. One hundred years ago, it was touted that “night-shade” foods, such as tomatoes, would aggravate rheumatoid arthritis. This is no longer accepted as true. There are no specific foods or food groups that should be universally avoided by individuals with rheumatoid arthritis.

There is no evidence that gluten bothers rheumatoid arthritis. Nevertheless, for those who are definitely sensitive to gluten (wheat, barley, and rye), the gluten-free diet can prevent poor intestinal absorption of important nutrients because the small intestines can become inflamed in these individuals. Bowel inflammation can be detrimental for those also affected by rheumatoid arthritis if they become deficient in nutrients, such as vitamin D and folate.

Foods that fight RA inflammation

Nevertheless, there are some home remedies that may be helpful, although these are not considered as potent or effective as disease-modifying drugs. Fish oils, such as in salmon, and omega-3 fatty acids supplements have been shown to be beneficial in some short-term studies in rheumatoid arthritis. This suggests that there may be benefits by adding more fish to the diet, such as in the popular Mediterranean diet. The anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin in dietary turmeric, an ingredient in curry, may be beneficial in reducing symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

Supplements for RA

Supplements such as calcium and vitamin D are used to prevent osteoporosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Folic acid is used as a supplement to prevent side effects of methotrexate treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Alcohol is minimized or avoided in rheumatoid arthritis patients taking methotrexate.

The benefits of cartilage preparations such as glucosamine and chondroitin for rheumatoid arthritis remain unproven. Symptomatic pain relief can often be achieved with oral acetaminophen (Tylenol) or over-the-counter topical preparations, which are rubbed into the skin. Antibiotics, in particular the tetracycline drug minocycline (Minocin), have been tried for rheumatoid arthritis recently in clinical trials. Early results have demonstrated mild to moderate improvement in the symptoms of arthritis. Minocycline has been shown to impede important mediator enzymes of tissue destruction, called metalloproteinases, in the laboratory as well as in humans.