Bladder Cancer – Treating Stage IV

These cancers have reached the abdominal or pelvic wall (T4b tumors) or have spread to nearby lymph nodes or distant parts of the body. Stage IV cancers are very hard to get rid of completely.

In most cases surgery (even radical cystectomy) can’t remove all of the cancer, so treatment is usually aimed at slowing the cancer’s growth and spread to help you live longer and feel better. If you and your doctor discuss surgery as treatment option, be sure you understand the goal of the operation – whether it is to try to cure the cancer, to help you live longer, or to help prevent or relieve symptoms from the cancer – before deciding on treatment.

For stage IV bladder cancers that have not spread to distant sites, chemotherapy (with or without radiation) is usually the first treatment. If the cancer shrinks in response to treatment, a cystectomy might be an option. Patients who can’t tolerate chemo (because of other health problems) might be treated with radiation therapy or with an immunotherapy drug such as atezolizumab or pembrolizumab.

For stage IV bladder cancers that have spread to distant areas, chemo is usually the first treatment, sometimes along with radiation therapy. Patients who can’t tolerate chemo (because of other health problems) might be treated with radiation therapy or with an immunotherapy drug such as atezolizumab or pembrolizumab. Urinary diversion without cystectomy is sometimes done to prevent or relieve a blockage of urine that could otherwise cause severe kidney damage.

Because treatment is unlikely to cure these cancers, taking part in a clinical trial may offer you access to newer forms of treatment that might help you live longer or relieve symptoms.